The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

The Tax Implications of Scottish Independence or Further Devolution

Frecknall Hughes, Jane; James, Simon and Mcilwhan, Rosemarie (2014). The Tax Implications of Scottish Independence or Further Devolution. Institute of Chartered Accountants Scotland, Edinburgh.

URL: http://icas.org.uk/Frecknall-hughes/
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

This report considers the tax implications of Scottish independence or further devolution. It addresses four overarching issues: the principles of taxation, addressing tax avoidance and evasion, development and implementation of tax systems, and managing institutional change in relation to tax systems. By way of literature review and interviews the report considers both the theoretical and practical implications of Scottish independence or further devolution for taxation in Scotland. It highlights key issues which need to be addressed in both scenarios as well as those issues which are specific to either devolution or independence. These issues include the suitability of the current tax system to Scotland; considerations involved in developing and administering a new tax system; the determining factors for designing a new system; the trade-offs and compromises involved; the time required for implementation; implementation issues; risks; educational needs to support a new system; compliance issues; and insights from other countries.

Item Type: Other
Copyright Holders: 2014 Institute of Chartered Accountants Scotland
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
The tax implications of Scottish independence or further devolutionC4380Institute of Chartered Accountants in Scotland
Extra Information: ISBN 978-1-909883-06-2
Keywords: tax; independence; devolution; Scotland
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Business and Law (FBL)
Other Departments > Other Departments
Other Departments
Item ID: 40525
Depositing User: Rosemarie Mcilwhan
Date Deposited: 16 Jul 2014 12:10
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2016 11:37
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/40525
Share this page:

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   + 44 (0)870 333 4340   general-enquiries@open.ac.uk