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Uncertainty, learning design, and interdisciplinarity: systems and design thinking in the school classroom

Macintyre, Ronald (2014). Uncertainty, learning design, and interdisciplinarity: systems and design thinking in the school classroom. In: 4th International Conference Designs for Learning: Expanding the Field, 6 -9 May 2014, Stockholm.

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Abstract

This paper explores aspects of learning design for design thinking within a small (circa 100) remote rural secondary (12-18 year old) school in the Highlands of Scotland. It introduces action research school teachers and final year (17-18 year old) pupils which explored how “real world” learning experiences can be brought into the classroom. It does so by joining two areas that are often treated as distinct practices. These are, the use of system theory and community development approaches to identify and map complex issues (Bell and Morse 2012), and the use of ideas from co-design to include non designers in the design process (Sanders and Westerlund 2011). The paper takes a grounded approach to the application of these ideas, simply asking “do they work”, and then “what”, “how” and “why”. In exploring those questions the paper tries to be open and transparent about learning design as a messy, uncertain and emergent process

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2014 Ronald Macintyre
Keywords: learning design; systems; schools; interdisciplinary
Academic Unit/School: Other Departments > Other Departments
Other Departments
Item ID: 40482
Depositing User: Ronald Macintyre
Date Deposited: 07 Jul 2014 09:15
Last Modified: 05 Oct 2016 20:12
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/40482
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