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Exploring co-studied Massive Open Online Course Subjects via social network analysis

Jordan, Katy (2014). Exploring co-studied Massive Open Online Course Subjects via social network analysis. International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning, 9(8) pp. 38–41.

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Abstract

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) allow students to study online courses without requiring previous experience or qualifications. This offers students the freedom to study a wide variety of topics, freed from the curriculum of a degree programme for example; however, it also poses a challenge for students in terms of making connections between individual courses. This paper examines the subjects which students at one MOOC platform (Coursera) choose to study. It uses a social network analysis based approach to create a network graph of co-studied subjects. The resulting network demonstrates a good deal of overlap between different disciplinary areas. Communities are identified within the graph and characterised. The results suggests that MOOC students may not be seeking to replicate degree-style courses in one specialist area, which may have implications for the future moves toward ‘MOOCs for credit’.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2014 Katy Jordan
ISSN: 1863-0383
Keywords: curricula; open education; Massive Open Online Courses; MOOCs; social network analysis
Academic Unit/School: Learning and Teaching Innovation (LTI) > Institute of Educational Technology (IET)
Learning and Teaching Innovation (LTI)
Item ID: 40384
Depositing User: Katy Jordan
Date Deposited: 12 Jun 2014 09:33
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2018 10:23
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/40384
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