The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Partial frequencies and Chladni’s law in church bells

Hibbert, William A.; Sharp, David B.; Taherzadeh, Shahram and Perrin, Robert (2014). Partial frequencies and Chladni’s law in church bells. Open Journal of Acoustics, 4(2) pp. 70–77.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Version of Record) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (750kB) | Preview
DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.4236/oja.2014.42007
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

The rim partials of a church bell (those with an antinode at the soundbow) generate the strike pitch or perceived note of the bell. The spacing in frequency of the higher rim partials has an important effect on the tonal quality of the bell. Investigations into the partial frequencies of 2752 bells, both bronze and steel, of a wide variety of dates, founders and sizes, show a simple and unexpected relationship between the frequencies of the rim partials. This relationship explains why attempts to tune the higher rim partials independently have failed. A modified version of Chladni’s law provides insight into the musical relationship of the partials, and predicts the partials of individual bells well, but fails to give a simple model of the spacing between the partials seen in bells with different profiles.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2014 by authors and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.
ISSN: 2162-5786
Keywords: church bell; partial frequencies; Chladni’s law; timbre; virtual pitch; strike pitch
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Engineering and Innovation
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Item ID: 40358
Depositing User: David Sharp
Date Deposited: 10 Jun 2014 08:11
Last Modified: 11 Sep 2017 15:31
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/40358
Share this page:

Altmetrics

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   contact the OU