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The positive outcomes of deep acting: a comparison between impulsive and institutionally oriented cultures.

Quinones-Garcia, Cristina; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Raquel and Clarke, Nicholas (2013). The positive outcomes of deep acting: a comparison between impulsive and institutionally oriented cultures. In: 13th Annual Conference of the European Academy of Management, 26-29 Jul 2013, Istanbul.

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Abstract

Deep Acting (DA) refers to the strategy whereby employees make an effort to feel the emotions required by the role. The present study examines the emotion regulation tendency (reappraisal) as antecedent of the strategy; and the intervening mechanisms explaining the impact of DA on relevant job attitudes (i.e. job commitment, professional efficacy and turnover intentions). The process was studied in two countries with different tendencies towards the free expression of emotions: Spain and UK. Results indicated that DA and turnover intentions were higher in the UK. Regarding the process, reappraisal predicted DA in both countries. Further, the relationship between DA and the relevant outcomes was explained by the experience of self-actualization through the interaction and increased job commitment. In short, this study offers a more positive view of the consequences of emotional labour. Thus, DA results in a resource development process that promotes positive job attitudes such as job commitment.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2013 The Authors
Keywords: deep acting; reappraisal; job commitment
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) > Business > Department for People and Organisations
Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) > Business
Faculty of Business and Law (FBL)
Related URLs:
Item ID: 39968
Depositing User: Cristina Quinones
Date Deposited: 24 Apr 2014 08:36
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2019 10:08
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/39968
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