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Open learning at a distance:lessons for struggling MOOCs

McAndrew, Patrick and Scanlon, Eileen (2013). Open learning at a distance:lessons for struggling MOOCs. Science, 342 pp. 1450–1451.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1239686
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Abstract

Free education is changing how people think about learning online. The rise of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) (1) shows that large numbers of learners can be reached. It also raises questions as to how effectively they support learning (2). There is a timeliness in the introduction of MOOCs, reflecting the right combination of online systems, interest from good teachers in reaching more learners, and banks of digital resources, predicted as a “perfect storm of innovation” (3). However, learning at scale, at a distance, is not a new phenomenon. Seeing MOOCs narrowly as a technology that expands access to in-classroom teaching can miss opportunities. Drawing on decades of lessons learned, we set out aims to help spur innovation in science education.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2013 The American Association for the Advancement of Science
ISSN: 1095-9203
Keywords: massive open online courses; open learning; distance education; tutors and tutoring; internet in education
Academic Unit/School: Learning Teaching and Innovation (LTI) > Institute of Educational Technology (IET)
Learning Teaching and Innovation (LTI)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Health and Wellbeing PRA (Priority Research Area)
Item ID: 39736
Depositing User: Eileen Scanlon
Date Deposited: 17 Mar 2014 09:33
Last Modified: 04 Sep 2017 09:11
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/39736
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