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Can't you count? Public service delivery and standardized measurement challenges - the case of community composting

Slater, Rachel and Aiken, Mike (2015). Can't you count? Public service delivery and standardized measurement challenges - the case of community composting. Public Management Review, 17(8) pp. 1085–1102.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1080/14719037.2014.881532
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Abstract

Performance measurement is increasingly important for UK third sector organisations (TSOs) driven in part by policy makers’ interest in harnessing them as deliverers of public services. This paper examines a developing and little researched constituency of TSOs - community composters - which has become attractive to policy makers facing obligations to reduce, recycle and re-use waste. The research, which included the first extensive survey of this constituency combined with a purposive case study investigation, found a highly diverse set of organisations. The analysis proposes five types of community composters and explores the challenges to developing a standardized measurement regime.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2014 Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN: 1471-9045
Keywords: performance measurement; third sector; community composting; social value
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Engineering and Innovation
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Innovation, Knowledge & Development research centre (IKD)
Item ID: 39501
Depositing User: Rachel Slater
Date Deposited: 13 Feb 2014 10:27
Last Modified: 18 May 2017 03:11
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/39501
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