‘Who rules this nation? (Ποιός κυβερνά αυτόν τον τόπο;): political intrigue and the struggle for power in Michael Cacoyannis’ Iphigenia (1977)’

Bakogianni, Anastasia (2013). ‘Who rules this nation? (Ποιός κυβερνά αυτόν τον τόπο;): political intrigue and the struggle for power in Michael Cacoyannis’ Iphigenia (1977)’. In: Bakogianni, Anastasia ed. Dialogues with the Past: Classical Reception Theory and Practice. BICS Supplement, 1 (126.1). London: Institute of Classical Studies, pp. 225–249.

Abstract

Bakogianni argues that the turbulence of modern Greek politics, the censorship and hardships of the military dictatorship (1967-74) and the invasion of his home island of Cyprus (1974) inform Cacoyannis reading of Euripides’ text. His 'Iphigenia' is his most politically engaged film in which he condemns unscrupulous politicians and the rule of the mob. In his film the discontented Greek army is ever present and is being manipulated by the demagogue Odysseus and the cruel priest Calchas. Agamemnon falls prey to his ambition to rule and gives in to their demands even at the cost of his daughter’s life.

Viewing alternatives

Item Actions

Export

About

Recommendations