The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

High-resolution soft x-ray spectrometry using the electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EM-CCD)

Hall, David J.; Tutt, James H.; Soman, Matthew; Holland, Andrew D.; Murray, Neil J.; Schmitt, Bernd and Schmitt, Thorsten (2013). High-resolution soft x-ray spectrometry using the electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EM-CCD). In: UV, X-Ray, and Gamma-Ray Space Instrumentation for Astronomy XVIII, SPIE, article no. 8859 0H.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Accepted Manuscript) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (2MB) | Preview
DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2024010
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

The Electron-Multiplying Charge-Coupled Device (EM-CCD) shares a similar structure to the CCD except for the inclusion of a gain register that multiplies signal before the addition of read-noise, offering sub-electron effective readnoise at high frame-rates. EM-CCDs were proposed for the dispersive spectrometer on the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) to bring sub-300 eV X-rays above the noise, increasing the science yield. The high-speed, low-noise performance of the EMCCD brought added advantages of reduced dark current and stray-light per frame, reducing cooling and filtering requirements. To increase grating efficiency, several diffracted spectral orders were co-located so the inherent energy resolution of the detector was required for order separation. Although the spectral resolution of the EM-CCD is degraded by the gain process, it was shown that the EM-CCD could achieve the required separation. The RIXS spectrometer at the Advanced Resonant Spectroscopy beamline (ADRESS) of the Swiss Light Source (SLS) at the Paul Scherrer Institute currently uses a CCD, with charge spreading between pixels limiting the spatial resolution to 24 μm (FWHM). Through improving the spatial resolution below 5 μm alongside upgrading the grating, a factor of two energy resolution improvement could theoretically be made. With the high-speed, low-noise performance of the EM-CCD, photon-counting modes could allow the use of centroiding techniques to improve the resolution. Using various centroiding techniques, a spatial resolution of 2 μm (FWHM) has been achieved experimentally, demonstrating the benefits of this detector technology for soft X-ray spectrometry. This paper summarises the use of EM-CCDs from our first investigations for IXO through to our latest developments in ground-based testing for synchrotron-research and looks beyond to future possibilities.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2013, Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, one print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic reproduction and distribution, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper are prohibited.
ISSN: 0277-786X
Extra Information: UV, X-Ray, and Gamma-Ray Space Instrumentation for Astronomy XVIII
edited by Oswald H. Siegmund
Proceedings of SPIE Vol. 8859
Keywords: electrons; charge-coupled devices; spectroscopy; X-rays; pectrometers; sensors; spectral resolution; electron multiplying charge coupled devices; light sources; observatories
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Physical Sciences
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Research Group: Centre for Electronic Imaging (CEI)
Space
Item ID: 39009
Depositing User: David Hall
Date Deposited: 18 Nov 2013 10:51
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2018 04:15
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/39009
Share this page:

Metrics

Altmetrics from Altmetric

Citations from Dimensions

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   contact the OU