Organ Recitals, education, repertoire, and a new musical public in nineteenth-century Edinburgh

Golding, Rosemary (2014). Organ Recitals, education, repertoire, and a new musical public in nineteenth-century Edinburgh. Ad Parnassum. A Journal of Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Instrumental Music, 12(24) pp. 89–113.

Abstract

The duties of the Reid Professor of Music at the University of Edinburgh included public musical performances in the form of annual ‘Reid festival’ concerts. The concerts sat uneasily between entertainment and education, and were a source of tension and trouble from the institution of the Professorship in 1837. Herbert Stanley Oakeley, Professor from 1865 to 1891, introduced a series of organ recitals to bridge the gap between his educational role as professor and the public face of the orchestral concerts. Using the recitals to introduce his audience to new music or to allow repeated hearings, Oakeley had an enormous influence on the repertoire heard and the reception of new music in Edinburgh during this period.

Viewing alternatives

Item Actions

Export

About

Recommendations