The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Reflections on a model of evaluating learning technologies

Jones, Ann; Scanlon, Eileen and Blake, Canan (1998). Reflections on a model of evaluating learning technologies. In: Oliver, Martin ed. Innovation in the Evaluation of Learning Technology. London: University of North London, pp. 25–40.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Version of Record) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (254kB) | Preview
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

This chapter discusses an evaluation framework, CIAO!, developed by the Computers and Learning Research Group at the Open University and used to evaluate students’ use of technology based teaching and learning on a number of different courses.

The framework has been described briefly elsewhere (Jones et. al. 1996) and case studies of its use have also been documented (Scanlon et. al, 1998). This chapter provides a critical reflection on its usefulness for evaluating teaching and learning technologies. The chapter begins with a discussion of important issues in evaluating technology-based teaching and the kinds of information that can be collected in an evaluation. It then introduces the framework and uses one of the evaluation studies conducted at the Open University in order to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the framework.

Item Type: Book Section
Copyright Holders: 1998 Martin Oliver
ISBN: 1-85377-256-9, 978-1-85377-256-6
Keywords: evaluation; learning technologies
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Learning and Teaching Innovation - Academic
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
Research Group: Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Item ID: 38760
Depositing User: Ann Jones
Date Deposited: 16 Oct 2013 13:58
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2019 11:48
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/38760
Share this page:

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   contact the OU