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Thermally induced decomposition of single-wall carbon nanotubes adsorbed on H/Si(111)

Hunt, Michael R. C.; Montalti, Massimo; Chao, Yimin; Krishnamurthy, Satheesh; Dhanak, Vinod R. and Šiller, Lidija (2002). Thermally induced decomposition of single-wall carbon nanotubes adsorbed on H/Si(111). Applied Physics Letters, 81(25), article no. 4847.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1063/1.1530747
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Abstract

The thermally driven reaction of carbon nanotubes with a silicon substrate is studied by photoemission spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Carbon nanotubes with a relatively high defect density are observed to decompose under reaction with silicon to form silicon carbide at temperatures (650±10 °C) substantially lower than the analogous reaction for adsorbed C60. The morphology of the resultant silicon carbide islands appears to reflect the morphology of the original nanotubes, suggesting a means by which SiC nanostrutures may be produced

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2002 American Institute of Physics
ISSN: 1077-3118
Extra Information: 3 pp.
Keywords: silicon; elemental semiconductors; carbon nanotubes; pyrolysis; adsorbed layers; surface chemistry; hydrogen; photoelectron spectra; atomic force microscopy; island structure; surface structure
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Engineering and Innovation
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Item ID: 38654
Depositing User: Satheesh Krishnamurthy
Date Deposited: 02 Oct 2013 13:17
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2018 18:34
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/38654
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