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Nietzsche’s critique of staticism: introduction to Nietzsche on Time and History

Dries, Manuel (2008). Nietzsche’s critique of staticism: introduction to Nietzsche on Time and History. In: Dries, Manuel ed. Nietzsche on Time and History. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, pp. 1–19.

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Abstract

Why are we still intrigued by Nietzsche? This chapter argues that sustained interest stems from Nietzsche’s challenge to what we might call the ‘staticism’ inherent in our ordinary experience. Staticism can be defined, roughly speaking, as the view that the world is a collection of enduring, re-identifiable objects that change only very gradually and according to determinate laws. The chapter discusses Nietzsche’s rejection of the remnants of staticism in Hegel and Schopenhauer (1). It outlines why Nietzsche deems belief in any variant of the staticist picture as problematic (2); and examines Nietzsche’s adualistic-dialetheic stance towards, for example, first-person and third-person descriptions in the philosophy of mind (3). The chapter closes with a discussion of the contributions of "Nietzsche on Time and History".

Item Type: Book Section
Copyright Holders: 2008 Walter de Gruyter
ISBN: 3-11-019009-5, 978-3-11-019009-0
Keywords: philosophy of history; history
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Politics, Philosophy, Economics, Development, Geography > Philosophy
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Politics, Philosophy, Economics, Development, Geography
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Item ID: 38217
Depositing User: Manuel Dries
Date Deposited: 22 Aug 2013 12:34
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2018 20:01
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/38217
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