The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Higher education policy in Scotland and the implications for part-time study

Cannell, Pete and Thomson, Joan (2012). Higher education policy in Scotland and the implications for part-time study. In: SRHE Annual Research Conference 2012: What is Higher Education for? Shared and contested ambitions, 12-14 December 2012, Celtic Manor, Newport, South Wales, UK.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Version of Record) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (98kB) | Preview
URL: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/conference2012/abstracts/014...
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

The Scottish Government have initiated a major reform of post-16 education with a stated aim of increased flexibility for learners, including more part-time provision. The Open University is the largest provider of part-time higher education (HE) in Scotland and evidence gathered from students who have studied in the college sector suggests that part-time learners value the flexibility of part-time study that allows them to repeat study at the same level or start at a lower level or change subject from previous study. This paper explores the policy changes being made and questions if this flexibility will be maintained for part-time learners in a climate of efficiency savings in HE provision? Will adequate opportunities be made available for them? Will further incentives be put in place to encourage more part-time learning?

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2012 The Authors
Keywords: post-16; articulation; transition; learner journey; further education
Academic Unit/School: Learning Teaching and Innovation (LTI) > Institute of Educational Technology (IET)
Learning Teaching and Innovation (LTI)
Other Departments > Other Departments
Other Departments
Related URLs:
Item ID: 38007
Depositing User: Joan Thomson
Date Deposited: 15 Jul 2013 08:33
Last Modified: 08 Feb 2017 14:46
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/38007
Share this page:

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   contact the OU