Enhancement of long-term memory retention by Colostrinin in one-day-old chicks trained on a weak passive avoidance learning paradigm

Stewart, Michael G. and Banks, Duncan (2006). Enhancement of long-term memory retention by Colostrinin in one-day-old chicks trained on a weak passive avoidance learning paradigm. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 86(1) pp. 66–71.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2005.12.011

Abstract

Colostrinin (CLN) is a biologically active proline-rich polypeptide which has therapeutic potential for the alleviation of memory deficits in age-related dementias in a number of human conditions, particularly Alzheimer's disease. To examine the efficacy of CLN in other species, day-old domestic chicks were used as a model system to study its effects on retention of memory for a single one-trial learning paradigm-avoidance of a bitter-tasting substance (methylanthranilate, MeA). Birds were presented with a bead coated with either a dilute (10%) solution of MeA or a bead coated with 100% MeA. Those trained on 100% MeA avoided pecking at a similar but dry bead 24h later, thereby demonstrating long-term memory whereas chicks trained on the 10% solution pecked the bead at 24h, indicating lack of long term memory for the task. However, when CLN was injected (i.c.) into a region known to be important in memory formation, the mesopallium intermediomediale (IMM), prior to training with 10% MeA, chicks exhibited strong memory retention at 24h, similar to those trained on 100% MeA. Control chicks trained on 10% MeA but injected i.c. with a 10% saline solution did not show improvement in memory retention. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of CLN were as effective as the i.c. route. These data extend the known efficacy of CLN from mammals demonstrating its widespread efficacy as a cognitive enhancer.

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