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‘Snitches get stitches’: US homicide detectives' ethics and morals in action

Westmarland, Louise (2013). ‘Snitches get stitches’: US homicide detectives' ethics and morals in action. Policing & Society, 23(3) pp. 311–327.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1080/10439463.2013.784313
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Abstract

This paper draws upon evidence from a short but intensive period of ethnographic fieldwork with a specialist homicide squad in a large US city. A range of homicides were observed during the study, and the discussion that follows describes a number of cases in depth and the difficulties the detectives experience in obtaining evidence from witnesses who may be frightened or unwilling to help them. The way they regard these problems and lack of cooperation, and the techniques they use to obtain information or confessions from suspects are explored. To analyse these problems, the paper reflects upon the ‘ruses’ detectives were observed to use in their attempts to obtain confessions and the way they rationalise these methods in terms of their personal and professional ethics.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2013 Taylor & Francis
ISSN: 1477-2728
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Not SetNot SetThe Open University
Keywords: policing; ethics; detectives; homicide
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > History, Religious Studies, Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: International Centre for Comparative Criminological Research (ICCCR)
Harm and Evidence Research Collaborative (HERC)
Item ID: 37771
Depositing User: Louise Westmarland
Date Deposited: 11 Jun 2013 14:54
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2016 11:28
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/37771
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