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Thermochemical modelling of the alteration assemblage in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 at low temperature (15–25 °C)

Melwani Daswani, M.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Wright, I. P. and Grady, M. M. (2013). Thermochemical modelling of the alteration assemblage in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 at low temperature (15–25 °C). In: The 3rd UK in Aurora Meeting: Advances in Mars Science, 8 Feb 2013, London, UK.

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Abstract

The origin of secondary carbonate minerals in the martian meteorite ALH84001 has been intensely debated in the literature, with widely different thermal origins considered: from hydrothermal [e.g. 1] to low temperature alteration [e.g. 2]. Isotopic evidence suggests the carbonates precipitated from evaporating water at 18±4 ºC under near-surface conditions [3]. We tested this latter scenario with the thermochemical modelling program CHIM-XPT at 15, 20 and 25 ºC; and pressures of 1 and 2 bar of atmospheric CO2. The water-to-rock ratio (W/R) was varied to obtain alteration precipitates. Isothermal evaporation scenarios were also modelled starting from W/R≤5. The composition of the ALH84001 host rock was obtained from [5] and the secondary phases were not included in the unaltered rock composition modelled. The composition of the starting fluid consisted of water equilibrated with 1 or 2 bar of atmospheric CO2.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2013 The Authors
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Physical Sciences
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Environment, Earth and Ecosystem Sciences
Research Group: Space
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Item ID: 37358
Depositing User: Susanne Schwenzer
Date Deposited: 10 Apr 2013 09:31
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2018 10:15
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/37358
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