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Photodesorption of CO ice

Öberg, Karin I.; Fuchs, Guido W.; Awad, Zainab; Fraser, Helen J.; Schlemmer, Stephan; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. and Linnartz, Harold (2007). Photodesorption of CO ice. Astrophysical Journal Letters, 662(1) L23-L26.

URL: http://iopscience.iop.org/1538-4357/662/1/L23/
DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1086/519281
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Abstract

At the high densities and low temperatures found in star forming regions, all molecules other than H2 should stick on dust grains on timescales shorter than the cloud lifetimes. Yet these clouds are detected in the millimeter lines of gaseous CO. At these temperatures, thermal desorption is negligible and hence a non-thermal desorption mechanism is necessary to maintain molecules in the gas phase. Here, the first laboratory study of the photodesorption of pure CO ice under ultra high vacuum is presented, which gives a desorption rate of 3 × 10−3 CO molecules per UV (7–10.5 eV) photon at 15 K. This rate is factors of 102-105 larger than previously estimated and is comparable to estimates of other non-thermal desorption rates. The experiments constrains the mechanism to a single photon desorption process of ice surface molecules. The measured efficiency of this process shows that the role of CO photodesorption in preventing total removal of molecules in the gas has been underestimated.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2007 The American Astronomical Society
ISSN: 1538-4357
Keywords: astrochemistry; abundances; molecular data; molecular processes
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Physical Sciences
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Related URLs:
Item ID: 37292
Depositing User: Stephen Serjeant
Date Deposited: 20 Jun 2013 09:51
Last Modified: 02 May 2018 13:51
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/37292
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