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Developing a domain-specific plug-in for a modelling platform: the good, the bad, the ugly

Montrieux, Lionel; Yu, Yijun and Wermelinger, Michel (2013). Developing a domain-specific plug-in for a modelling platform: the good, the bad, the ugly. In: 3rd Workshop on Developing Tools as Plug-ins, 21 May 2013, San Francisco.

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Abstract

Domain-Specific Modelling Languages (DSML) allow software engineers to use the techniques and tools of Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) to express, represent and analyse a particular domain. By defining DSMLs as UML profiles, i.e. domain-specific extensions of the UML metamodel, development time for DSMLs can be greatly reduced by extending existing UML tools. In this paper, we reflect on our own experience in building rbacUML, a DSML for Role-Based Access Control modelling and analysis, as a plugin for a UML modelling platform. We describe what motivated our choice, and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of using an existing platform to develop a DSML on top of UML and additional analysis tooling.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2013 IEEE
Extra Information: ICSE 2013 Workshop, San Francisco, May 21st, 2013
Keywords: MDE; RBAC; OCL; Eclipse; modelling; plugin
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Computing and Communications
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Policing Research and Learning (CPRL)
Centre for Research in Computing (CRC)
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Item ID: 36816
Depositing User: Lionel Montrieux
Date Deposited: 11 Mar 2013 10:47
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2017 11:02
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/36816
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