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Stillbirth and loss: family practices and display

Murphy, Sam and Thomas, Hilary (2013). Stillbirth and loss: family practices and display. Sociological Research Online, 18(1)

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Abstract

This paper explores how parents respond to their memories of their stillborn child over the years following their loss. When people die after living for several years or more, their family and friends have the residual traces of a life lived as a basis for an identity that may be remembered over a sustained period of time. For the parent of a stillborn child there is no such basis and the claim for a continuing social identity for their son or daughter is precarious. Drawing on interviews with the parents of 22 stillborn children, this paper explores the identity work performed by parents concerned to create a lasting and meaningful identity for their child and to include him or her in their families after death. The paper draws on Finch's (2007) concept of family display and Walter's (1999) thesis that links continue to exist between the living and the dead over a continued period. The paper argues that evidence from the experience of stillbirth suggests that there is scope for development for both theoretical frameworks.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2013 Sociological Research Online
ISSN: 1360-7804
Extra Information: 11 pp.
Keywords: stillbirth; identity; qualitative research; parenting
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care > Health and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
Item ID: 36752
Depositing User: Sam Murphy
Date Deposited: 01 Mar 2013 10:31
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2018 05:36
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/36752
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