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Whose fashion? Men, women and Roman culture as reflected in dress in the cities of the Roman north-west

Rothe, Ursula (2013). Whose fashion? Men, women and Roman culture as reflected in dress in the cities of the Roman north-west. In: Hemelrijk, Emily and Woolf, Greg eds. Women and the Roman City in the Latin West. Mnemosyne Supplements, History and Archaeology of Classical Antiquity (360). Leiden: Brill, pp. 243–268.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004255951_014
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Abstract

[About the book]

Roman Cities, as conventionally studied, seem to be dominated by men. Yet as the contributions to this volume—which deals with the Roman cities of Italy and the western provinces in the late Republic and early Empire—show, women occupied a wide range of civic roles. Women had key roles to play in urban economies, and a few were prominent public figures, celebrated for their generosity and for their priestly eminence, and commemorated with public statues and grand inscriptions. Drawing on archaeology and epigraphy, on law and art as well as on ancient texts, this multidisciplinary study offers a new and more nuanced view of the gendering of civic life. It asks how far the experience of women of the smaller Italian and provincial cities resembled that of women in the capital, how women were represented in sculptural art as well as in inscriptions, and what kinds of power or influence they exercised in the societies of the Latin West.

Item Type: Book Section
Copyright Holders: 2013 Not known
ISBN: 90-04-25594-X, 978-90-04-25594-4
Extra Information: ISSN: 0169-8958
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Arts and Humanities > Classical Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Arts and Humanities
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
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Item ID: 36715
Depositing User: Ursula Rothe
Date Deposited: 02 Dec 2014 09:50
Last Modified: 06 Aug 2019 08:44
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/36715
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