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Consent is a grey area? A comparison of understandings of consent in 50 Shades of Grey and on the BDSM blogosphere

Barker, Meg (2013). Consent is a grey area? A comparison of understandings of consent in 50 Shades of Grey and on the BDSM blogosphere. Sexualities, 16(8) pp. 896–914.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1177/1363460713508881
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Abstract

Whilst the Fifty Shades trilogy has increased public awareness of BDSM (bondage and discipline, dominance and submission, and sadomasochism), the understandings of consent depicted in the novels remain reflective of those prevalent in wider heteronormative culture. Responsibility for consenting is located within the individual (woman) and consent relates to sex rather than to the relationship as a whole. This contrasts with understandings of consent currently emerging on the BDSM blogosphere where the locus of responsibility is shifting from individuals to communities, and the concept is opening up to encompass awareness of intersecting social power dynamics and interactions beyond the sexual arena.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2013 The Authors
ISSN: 1461-7382
Extra Information: Special Issue: Reading the Fifty Shades ‘phenomenon’
Keywords: abuse; BDSM; consent; Fifty Shades; gender; kink; power
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Psychology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Citizenship, Identities and Governance (CCIG)
Related URLs:
Item ID: 36696
Depositing User: Meg-John Barker
Date Deposited: 28 Feb 2013 10:53
Last Modified: 20 Jun 2017 15:31
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/36696
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