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Towards a multisensory experience of movement in the City of Rome

Betts, Eleanor (2011). Towards a multisensory experience of movement in the City of Rome. In: Laurence, Ray and Newsome, David J. eds. Rome, Ostia and Pompeii: Movement and Space. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 118–132.

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URL: http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199583126.d...
DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199583126.003.0005
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Abstract

This chapter demonstrates how a framework for multisensory mapping of the ancient city may be developed from sensory data recovered from classical literature, epigraphy and the archaeological record for ancient Rome, utilising methodologies from phenomenological fieldwork (empirical visual, auditory and olfactory data collection) and theoretical approaches from sensual research. The aim of the chapter is to encourage adoption of a multisensory approach, adding layers of understanding of the ancient city that are accessible via a methodologically sound examination of smell, taste, hearing, touch, as well as sight.

Item Type: Book Section
Copyright Holders: 2011 Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0-19-958312-9, 978-0-19-958312-6
Keywords: Rome; Roman; movement; space; multisensory mapping; sensory data; ancient Rome; sensory experience
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Arts and Cultures > Classical Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Arts and Cultures
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Item ID: 35859
Depositing User: Eleanor Betts
Date Deposited: 18 Dec 2012 15:45
Last Modified: 09 Dec 2018 17:47
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/35859
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