The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Testing a computational model of rhythm perception using polyrhythmic stimuli

Angelis, Vassilis; Holland, Simon; Upton, Paul J. and Clayton, Martin (2013). Testing a computational model of rhythm perception using polyrhythmic stimuli. Journal of New Music Research, 42(1) pp. 47–60.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Accepted Manuscript) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (2661Kb) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF (Accepted Manuscript) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (963Kb) | Preview
DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09298215.2012.718791
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

Neural resonance theory suggests that the perception of rhythm arises as a result of auditory neural populations responding to the structure of the incoming auditory stimulus. Here, we examine the extent to which the responses of a computational model of neural resonance relate to the range of tapping behaviours associated with human polyrhythm perception. The principal findings of the tests suggest that: (a) the model is able to mirror all the different modes of human tapping behaviour, for reasonably justified settings and (b) the non-linear resonance feature of the model has clear advantages over linear oscillator models in addressing human tapping behaviours related to polyrhythm perception.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2012 Taylor & Francis
ISSN: 1744-5027
Extra Information: First published online: 01 Nov 2012
Academic Unit/Department: Mathematics, Computing and Technology > Computing & Communications
Mathematics, Computing and Technology > Mathematics and Statistics
Arts > Music
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Computing (CRC)
Related URLs:
Item ID: 35068
Depositing User: Simon Holland
Date Deposited: 31 Oct 2012 11:00
Last Modified: 30 Oct 2014 14:54
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/35068
Share this page:

Altmetrics

Scopus Citations

Actions (login may be required)

View Item
Report issue / request change

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   + 44 (0)870 333 4340   general-enquiries@open.ac.uk