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Black British Jazz: Routes, Ownership and Performance

Toynbee, Jason; Tackley, Catherine and Doffman, Mark eds. (2014). Black British Jazz: Routes, Ownership and Performance. Ashgate Popular and Folk Music Series. Farnham: Ashgate.

URL: http://www.ashgate.com/isbn/9781472417565
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Abstract

Black British musicians have been making jazz since around 1920 when the genre first arrived in Britain. This groundbreaking book reveals their hidden history and major contribution to the development of jazz in the UK. More than this, though, the chapters show the importance of black British jazz in terms of musical hybridity and the cultural significance of race. Decades before Steel Pulse, Soul II Soul, or Dizzee Rascal pushed their way into the mainstream, black British musicians were playing jazz in venues up and down the country from dance halls to tiny clubs. In an important sense, then, black British jazz demonstrates the crucial importance of musical migration in the musical history of the nation, and the links between popular and avant-garde forms. But the volume also provides a case study in how music of the African diaspora reverberates around the world, beyond the shores of the USA - the engine-house of global black music. As such it will engage scholars of music and cultural studies not only in Britain, but across the world.

Item Type: Edited Book
Copyright Holders: 2012 The Editors
ISBN: 1-4724-1756-9, 978-1-4724-1756-5
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
What is Black British Jazz? Routes, Ownership, PerformanceAH/G013586/1AHRC (Arts & Humanities Research Council)
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Arts and Humanities > Music
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Arts and Humanities
Item ID: 34482
Depositing User: Catherine Tackley
Date Deposited: 09 Oct 2012 15:13
Last Modified: 06 Aug 2019 08:40
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/34482
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