Orthographic analogy use and phonological priming effects in non-word reading

Wood, Clare and Farrington-Flint, Lee (2001). Orthographic analogy use and phonological priming effects in non-word reading. Cognitive Development, 16(4) pp. 951–963.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0885-2014(02)00071-0

Abstract

The orthographic analogy effect for rime-based analogies has been debated, and theoretical arguments relating to the role of rhyme awareness in reading development have been questioned. This study assessed whether children beginning to read are able to make genuine orthographic analogies based on rime similarity. A non-word version of the clue word task was used to compare children’s performance at reading orthographically and phonologically similar target items and phonologically similar items only. They were also assessed on their ability to make analogies between the beginnings and endings of words. The results were consistent with the suggestion that orthographic analogy use is available to beginning readers as a reading strategy, and that rime-based analogies are easier to make than analogies at the beginning ofwords. However, rhyme awarenesswas found to account for variance in orthographic analogy use between the beginnings of words, but not for rime-based analogies. The implications of this for the theoretical role of rhyme awareness in reading development are discussed.

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