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The Mystery Man can help reduce false identifications for child witnesses:evidence from video lineups

Havard, Catriona and Memon, Amina (2013). The Mystery Man can help reduce false identifications for child witnesses:evidence from video lineups. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 27(1) pp. 50–59.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.2870
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Abstract

It is well established that children (as young as 5 years) can correctly identify a target from a target present (TP) line-up as accurately as adults; however, when shown a target absent (TA) line-up, children make more false identifications. In the present study, children aged 5–7 and 8–11 years viewed a film of a staged theft, then 1–2 days later were shown either a TP or TA video line-up. Half of the witnesses viewed line-ups that included a ‘mystery man’ (a black silhouette with a white question mark), which they could select if they did not recognise anyone from the line-up. When the ‘mystery man’ was present in the line-up, there were significantly fewer false identifications for the TA line-ups. This study shows that including a silhouette in a video line-up can help reduce false identifications for children as young as 5 years of age, without reducing correct identifications.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN: 1099-0720
Keywords: identification parade; children; false identification
Academic Unit/Department: Social Sciences > Psychology in the Social Sciences
Related URLs:
Item ID: 34361
Depositing User: Catriona Havard
Date Deposited: 17 Sep 2012 09:05
Last Modified: 19 Jan 2014 15:17
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/34361
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