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Search for life on Mars in surface samples: lessons from the 1999 Marsokhod rover field experiment

Newsom, H.E.; Bishop, Janice L.; Cockell, Charles; Roush, Ted L. and Johnson, Jeffrey R. (2001). Search for life on Mars in surface samples: lessons from the 1999 Marsokhod rover field experiment. Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, 106(E4) pp. 7713–7720.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/1999JE001159
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Abstract

The Marsokhod 1999 field experiment in the Mojave Desert included a simulation of a rover-based sample selection mission. As part of this mission, a test was made of strategies and analytical techniques for identifying past or present life in environments expected to be present on Mars. A combination of visual clues from high-resolution images and the detection of an important biomolecule (chlorophyll) with visible/near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy led to the successful identification of a rock with evidence of cryptoendolithic organisms. The sample was identified in high-resolution images (3 times the resolution of the Imager for Mars Pathfinder camera) on the basis of a green tinge and textural information suggesting the presence of a thin, partially missing exfoliating layer revealing the organisms. The presence of chlorophyll bands in similar samples was observed in visible/NIR spectra of samples in the field and later confirmed in the laboratory using the same spectrometer. Raman spectroscopy in the laboratory, simulating a remote measurement technique, also detected evidence of carotenoids in samples from the same area. Laboratory analysis confirmed that the subsurface layer of the rock is inhabited by a community of coccoid Chroococcidioposis cyanobacteria. The identification of minerals in the field, including carbonates and serpentine, that are associated with aqueous processes was also demonstrated using the visible/NIR spectrometer. Other lessons learned that are applicable to future rover missions include the benefits of web-based programs for target selection and for daily mission planning and the need for involvement of the science team in optimizing image compression schemes based on the retention of visual signature characteristics.

Item Type: Journal Article
ISSN: 1934-8843
Keywords: Geochemistry: Planetary geochemistry, Geochemistry: Instruments and techniques, Planetology: Solid Surface Planets: Remote sensing, Planetology: Solar System Objects: Mars
Academic Unit/Department: Science > Physical Sciences
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Earth, Planetary, Space and Astronomical Research (CEPSAR)
Item ID: 3402
Depositing User: Users 6044 not found.
Date Deposited: 30 Jun 2006
Last Modified: 02 Sep 2011 09:38
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/3402
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