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Automatically structuring domain knowledge from text: a review of current research

Clark, Malcolm; Kim, Yunhyong; Kruschwitz, Udo; Song, Dawei; Albakour, M-Dyaa; Dignum, Stephen; Cerviño Beresi, Ulises; Fasli, Maria and De Roeck, Anne (2012). Automatically structuring domain knowledge from text: a review of current research. Information Processing and Management, 48(3) pp. 552–568.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ipm.2011.07.002
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Abstract

This paper presents an overview of automatic methods for building domain knowledge structures (domain models) from text collections. Applications of domain models have a long history within knowledge engineering and artificial intelligence. In the last couple of decades they have surfaced noticeably as a useful tool within natural language processing, information retrieval and semantic web technology. Inspired by the ubiquitous propagation of domain model structures that are emerging in several research disciplines, we give an overview of the current research landscape and some techniques and approaches. We will also discuss trade-offs between different approaches and point to some recent trends.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2011 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN: 0306-4573
Keywords: domain models; information retrieval; natural language processing; artificial intelligence
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Computing and Communications
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Computing (CRC)
Item ID: 33891
Depositing User: Dawei Song
Date Deposited: 21 Jun 2012 08:23
Last Modified: 29 Nov 2016 17:54
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/33891
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