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Compact H II regions in the molecular cloud G35.2 - 0.74

Dent, W. R. F.; Little, L. T. and White, G. J. (1984). Compact H II regions in the molecular cloud G35.2 - 0.74. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 210 pp. 173–181.

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URL: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/full/1984MNRAS.210..173D
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Abstract

We present high-resolution 6-cm continuum observations of the molecular cloud G35.2 - 0.74. Two sources associated with the cloud were detected, one of which (G35.2S) is a near-symmetric H II region with a diameter of ~0.37 pc. It is thought that a stellar wind, rather than pressure expansion of the H II region, could be responsible for the unusual 3-km s-1 molecular line-splitting observed around this object. The second continuum source (G35.2N) has a double-peaked structure, with an orientation very close to that of the surrounding dense elongated molecular cloud. A model which might explain both the structure of G35.2N and the detection of bipolar outflow in HCO+ (Matthews et al. 1984) is that of a disk-constrained outflow, as proposed for S106 by Bally and Scoville 1982.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 1984 Royal Astronomical Society
ISSN: 1365-2966
Keywords: astronomical spectroscopy; HII regions; molecular clouds; stellar winds; astronomical models; continuous spectra; formyl ions; high resolution
Academic Unit/Department: Science > Physical Sciences
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Earth, Planetary, Space and Astronomical Research (CEPSAR)
Item ID: 33780
Depositing User: Glenn White
Date Deposited: 07 Jun 2012 14:41
Last Modified: 17 Jul 2013 08:49
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/33780
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