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Global impacts of sulfate deposition from acid rain on methane emissions from natural wetlands

Gauci, V. (2003). Global impacts of sulfate deposition from acid rain on methane emissions from natural wetlands. In: EGS - AGU - EUG Joint Assembly, 6 - 11 April 2003, Nice, France.

URL: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA.....9434G
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Abstract

Natural wetlands form the largest methane (CH4) source to the atmosphere. A collection of recent field and laboratory studies point to an anthropogenic control on CH4 emissions from these systems: acid rain sulfate (SO42-) deposition. These studies ranging from the UK, USA, Canada, Sweden and Czech Republic demonstrate that low rates of SO42- deposition, within the range commonly experienced in acid rain impacted regions, can suppress CH4 emissions by as much as 40% and that the response of CH4 emissions to increasing rates of SO42- deposition closely mirrors changes in sulfate reduction rates with SO42- deposition. This indicates that the suppression in CH4 flux is the result of acid rain stimulating a competitive exclusion of methanogenesis by sulfate reducing bacteria, resulting in reduced methane production. These findings were extrapolated to the global scale by combining modelled, spatially explicit data sets of CH4 emission from wetlands across the globe with modelled S deposition. Results indicate that this interaction may be important at the global scale, suppressing CH4 emissions from wetlands in 2030 by as much as 20--28Tg, and, in the process, offsetting predicted climate induced growth in the wetland CH4 source.

Item Type: Conference Item
Copyright Holders: 2003 The Author
Extra Information: abstract #9434
Academic Unit/Department: Science > Environment, Earth and Ecosystems
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: OpenSpace Research Centre (OSRC)
Centre for Earth, Planetary, Space and Astronomical Research (CEPSAR)
Item ID: 33588
Depositing User: Vincent Gauci
Date Deposited: 18 May 2012 08:23
Last Modified: 18 May 2012 08:27
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/33588
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