The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Social policy and state revenues in mineral-rich contexts

Hinojosa-Valencia, Leonith; Bebbington, Anthony and Barrientos, Armando (2012). Social policy and state revenues in mineral-rich contexts. In: Hujo, Katja ed. Mineral rents and the financing of social policy. Opportunities and challenges. Social Policy in a Development Context. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 91–121.

URL: http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?pid=56...
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

This paper challenges the determinism of the resource curse hypothesis. It suggests that concerns about perverse effects of mineral rents on social development can be addressed by assessing the implications of growth and development strategies based on the expansion of mineral sectors for social welfare, and the extent to which the exploitation of mineral resources has produced the expected effects on government revenue and expenditure. This approach narrows the field of study to MDCs only, and aims to reveal the extent to which the level of mineral export dependence influences social policy making. With that purpose, this paper provides a cross-country analysis of the linkages between state revenue and social policy in contexts of mineral wealth, and presents an approach to identify those linkages and the effects of a mineral-led development strategy on welfare regimes.

Item Type: Book Chapter
Copyright Holders: 2012 UNRISD
ISBN: 0-230-37090-X, 978-0-230-37090-6
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Not SetNot SetUNRISD
Keywords: social policy; mineral rents; developing countries; resource curse
Academic Unit/Department: Social Sciences > Geography
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: OpenSpace Research Centre (OSRC)
Item ID: 33121
Depositing User: Leonith Hinojosa-Valencia
Date Deposited: 07 Mar 2012 15:08
Last Modified: 02 Aug 2013 11:28
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/33121
Share this page:

Actions (login may be required)

View Item
Report issue / request change

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   + 44 (0)870 333 4340   general-enquiries@open.ac.uk