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Plants, power and productivity: the East India Company and cotton imperialism in early nineteenth-century India

Hazareesingh, Sandip (2011). Plants, power and productivity: the East India Company and cotton imperialism in early nineteenth-century India. Backdoor Broadcasting Company, London, UK.

URL: http://backdoorbroadcasting.net/2011/12/sandip-haz...
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Abstract

This paper focuses on how plant dissemination and experimentation were closely implicated in the East India Company's quest to establish political hegemony over the rural populations of the newly conquered territories of western India. It examines the motivations underlying, and outcomes of, the first botanical garden experiments in western India and the attempts to introduce foreign varieties of cotton. It reveals the flawed assumptions of colonial rural governance strategies that paid little attention to the ecologies of local peasant cultivator livelihoods.

Item Type: Other
Copyright Holders: 2011 Backdoor Broadcasting Company
Academic Unit/Department: Arts > History
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: OpenSpace Research Centre (OSRC)
Item ID: 32562
Depositing User: Sandip Hazareesingh
Date Deposited: 14 Feb 2012 11:14
Last Modified: 23 Oct 2012 14:21
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/32562
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