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The colours of money: artmoney as community currency

Banks, Mark (2011). The colours of money: artmoney as community currency. International Journal of Community Currency Research, 15 pp. 77–81.

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Abstract

Artmoney is a community currency based on the production and exchange of original art. Critical of the cold and objective nature of conventional transactions, the Danish artist Lars Kraemmer first devised artmoney as a means to a more humanised and expressive type of monetary exchange, intending to bring people together in affective, rather than impersonal, forms of trade. Artmoney provides a means of stimulating trade amongst artists and non-artists outside of the conventional money economy, and has grown steadily to become a global currency traded in over 70 countries. Drawing from ongoing research, this article asks, what is the meaning and value of art-money in a global cultural economy? What alternative does it present and what economic futures (or pasts) does it anticipate? Presenting preliminary findings from interview research with art-money producers, this article outlines some of the motives for becoming involved in this art/currency project, and some of the contradictions and challenges raised in its production and circulation.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2011 Not known
ISSN: 1325-9547
Extra Information: Volume 15 (2011) Special issue
Complementary Currencies: State of the Art
edited by Noel Longhurst and Gill Seyfang
Academic Unit/Department: Social Sciences > Sociology
Social Sciences
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: OpenSpace Research Centre (OSRC)
Item ID: 31382
Depositing User: Mark Banks
Date Deposited: 13 Jan 2012 12:03
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2016 11:38
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/31382
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