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A qualitative comparative analysis of factors associated with trends in narrowing health inequalities in England

Blackman, Tim; Wistow, Jonathan and Byrne, David (2011). A qualitative comparative analysis of factors associated with trends in narrowing health inequalities in England. Social Science & Medicine, 72(12) pp. 1965–1974.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.04.003
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Abstract

This study explores why progress with tackling health inequalities has varied among a group of local authority areas in England that were set targets to narrow important health outcomes compared to national averages. It focuses on premature deaths from cancers and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and whether the local authority gap for these outcomes narrowed. Survey and secondary data were used to create dichotomised conditions describing each area. For cancers, ten conditions were found to be associated with whether or not narrowing occurred: presence/absence of a working culture of individual commitment and champions; spending on cancer programmes; aspirational or comfortable/complacent organisational cultures; deprivation; crime; assessments of strategic partnership working, commissioning and the public health workforce; frequency of progress reviews; and performance rating of the local Primary Care Trust (PCT). For CVD, six conditions were associated with whether or not narrowing occurred: a PCT budget closer or further away from target; assessments of primary care services, smoking cessation services and local leadership; presence/absence of a few major programmes; and population turnover. The method of Qualitative Comparative Analysis was used to find configurations of these conditions with either the narrowing or not narrowing outcomes. Narrowing cancer gaps were associated with three configurations in which individual commitment and champions was a necessary condition, and not narrowing was associated with a group of conditions that had in common a high level of bureaucratic-type work. Narrowing CVD gaps were associated with three configurations in which a high assessment of either primary care or smoking cessation services was a necessary condition, and not narrowing was associated with two configurations that both included an absence of major programmes. The article considers substantive and theoretical arguments for these configurations being causal and as pointing to ways of improving progress with tackling health inequalities.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
ISSN: 0277-9536
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Not SetNot SetNational Institute for Health Research
Extra Information: Part Special Issue: Analysing global health assistance. Edited by Devi Sridhar and David Craig

NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Social Science & Medicine. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published as stated above.
Keywords: health inequalities; cancer; cardiovascular disease; England; Qualitative Comparative Analysis; spearhead areas; UK; mortality
Academic Unit/Department: Other Departments > Vice-Chancellor's Office
Item ID: 30966
Depositing User: Tim Blackman
Date Deposited: 12 Jan 2012 10:10
Last Modified: 26 Jul 2014 17:51
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/30966
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