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The anterior cingulate (BA24c, BA32), ectorhinal (BA36) and triangular (BA45) cortices in autism: a stereological investigation of deep cortical layers and subcortical white matter

Dunham, J. S.; Del Valle Suarez, E. M.; Schmitz, C.; Gabbott, P. L. and Rezaie, P. (2011). The anterior cingulate (BA24c, BA32), ectorhinal (BA36) and triangular (BA45) cortices in autism: a stereological investigation of deep cortical layers and subcortical white matter. In: 112th Meeting of the British Neuropathological Society, 05-07 Jan 2011, Institute of Child Health, London.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2990.2010.01143.x/pdf
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Abstract

The neurobiology underlying behavioural impairments in autism is unclear. Cortical lamination progresses sequentially during mid-gestation, with layer 6 (L6), then layer 5 (L5) populated by neurons. Early developmental
disturbances could disrupt cellular arrangements within these layers. A reduction in L5 and L6 neuron numbers in fusiform gyrus (1), and anterior cingulate cortex (2) is reported in autism. We investigated neuron and glial densities in L5, L6 and subjacent white matter (WM) in cortical areas considered to be functionally affected in autism.

Item Type: Conference Item
Copyright Holders: 2011 The Authors
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Not SetNot SetAutism Speaks
Extra Information: Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology (2011), 37 (Suppl. 1), 7–42 ISSN: 0305-1846
Academic Unit/Department: Science > Life, Health and Chemical Sciences
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Biomedical Research Network (BRN)
Item ID: 27957
Depositing User: Payam Rezaie
Date Deposited: 18 Mar 2011 09:38
Last Modified: 10 Mar 2014 09:26
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/27957
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