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Placing the people makes the place: the effect of employees’ place of work and their organizational fit in The Open University

Godrich, Stephen G. (2009). Placing the people makes the place: the effect of employees’ place of work and their organizational fit in The Open University. In: British Academy of Management Annual Conference 2009: The End of the Pier? Competing perspectives on the challenges facing business and management, 15-17 Sep 2009, Brighton, UK.

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Abstract

This paper looks at where people work, in relation to an organization’s central (head) office, and its effect on levels of organizational fit. It will suggest that organizational fit may be reduced according to whether employees work in the head office, regional offices or are home-anchored. The question as to the extent to which regional and/or home-anchored employees still have some degree of fit (and possible reasons for this) or regionality becomes a safe haven for misfits (and the implications of this) will also be considered.

The paper considers and questions, in the light of ASA theory, whether misfits are likely to leave or, indeed, in a regional or home-anchored situation, may become centres for organizational learning/innovation and/or resistance. It goes on to suggest a means for testing the hypotheses with a study of employees at the Open University.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2009 The Author
Keywords: fit; organizational fit
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) > Business
Faculty of Business and Law (FBL)
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Item ID: 27867
Depositing User: Steve Godrich
Date Deposited: 08 Feb 2011 15:10
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2018 12:58
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/27867
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