The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

e-Learning in the Development of Design Skills and Knowledge at the Open University

Holden, Georgina and Garner, Steven (2005). e-Learning in the Development of Design Skills and Knowledge at the Open University. In: Designs on eLearning, 14-15 Sep 2005, London.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Accepted Manuscript) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (711kB)
URL: http://www.designsonelearning.net/conferences/face...
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

The Open University (OU) has a distinguished track record in distance education. This paper examines the teaching methods and learning outcomes of a new introductory course in design at the OU. which uses a combination of paper and ICT based learning resources to support the development of design knowledge and skills by a wide range of students.

The course enables students of all levels of design ability to develop design skills through their studies. This paper argues that the teaching methods used within the course, demonstrate the potential for e-learning in the design curricula.

The core e-learning resources discussed are a purpose made DVD which presents students with a suite of resources; A flexible learning environment that uses a set of related electronic conferences and a course website. The paper draws on student feedback to highlight the effectiveness of e learning for design education.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2011 The Authors
Keywords: design; distance learning; ICT
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Engineering and Innovation
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Research Group: Design and Innovation
Related URLs:
Item ID: 27863
Depositing User: Georgina Holden
Date Deposited: 11 Apr 2011 08:41
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2018 12:44
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/27863
Share this page:

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   contact the OU