The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Exploring the adoption of interactive digital television services as a retail shopping platform

Anastasakis, Leonidas and Ellis-Chadwick, Fiona (2010). Exploring the adoption of interactive digital television services as a retail shopping platform. In: The Six Senses: the Essentials of Marketing: 39th EMAC Conference, 1-4 Jun 2010, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Accepted Manuscript) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (105kB)
URL: http://www.emac2010.org/r/default.asp?iId=EGMLJD
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

The aim of this research is to consider the possible effect of an emerging technology platform on the uptake of online shopping: interactive (digital) Television (iTV), which enables viewers to select a variety of viewing options, publicity materials, games, entertainment and more recently shopping. An augmented version of the original TAM is applied to this study. Two new constructs are considered namely access and awareness together with perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, perceived enjoyment and security. The results show that indeed the augmented TAM can be used as a predictive model for the adoption of iTV as an online shopping platform. It is concluded that access, perceived ease of use, perceived enjoyment and perceived usefulness are significant factors to determine the consumers’behavioural intentions towards the use of digital TV as a new shopping platform. However, awareness and security are considered to be insignificant with no effect on consumers’ behavioural intentions towards the new shopping medium.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: The Authors
Keywords: TAM model; remote shopping; interactive television
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Business and Law (FBL)
Item ID: 27769
Depositing User: Fiona Ellis-Chadwick
Date Deposited: 01 Feb 2011 11:48
Last Modified: 10 May 2019 16:23
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/27769
Share this page:

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   contact the OU