The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Preliminary results on Cretaceous-Tertiary tropical Atlantic pelagic sedimentation (Demerara Rise, ODP Leg 207)

Danelian, Taniel; Le Callonec, Laurence; Erbacher, Jochen; Mosher, David C.; Malone, Mitchell J.; Berti, Debora; Bice, Karen L.; Bostock, Helen; Brumsack, Hans-Jurgen; Forster, Astrid; Heidersdorf, Felix; Henderiks, Jorijntje; Janecek, Thomas J.; Junium, Christopher; Macleod, Ken; Meyers, Philip A.; Mutterlose, Jorg H.; Nishi, Hiroshi; Norris, Richard D.; Ogg, James G.; O’Regan, Matthew A.; Rea, Brice; Sexton, Philip; Sturt-Fredricks, Helen; Suganuma, Yusuke; Thurow, Jurgen W.; Wilson, Paul A.; Wise, Sherwood W. and Glatz, Catherine (2005). Preliminary results on Cretaceous-Tertiary tropical Atlantic pelagic sedimentation (Demerara Rise, ODP Leg 207). Comptes Rendus Geoscience, 337(6) pp. 609–616.

Full text available as:
Full text not publicly available
Due to copyright restrictions, this file is not available for public download
DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.crte.2005.01.011
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

Five sites located on a bathymetric transect of the distal Demerara Rise were studied by ODP Leg 207. Albian sediments of essentially terrigenous nature (clay, siltstone, sandstone) are the oldest drilled stratigraphic levels and form apparently the top of the synrift sequence. They are overlain by Cenomanian to Santonian finely laminated black shales, rich in organic matter of marine origin, which accumulated on a thermally subsiding ramp. Early Campanian hiatuses are thought to be the result of final disjunction of Demerara Rise (South America) from Africa and the onset of deep water communication between the two Atlantic basins (south and central). The overlying Uppermost Cretaceous–Oligocene chalk includes rich and diversified calcareous plankton assemblages, as well as two radiolarian-rich intervals (Late Campanian and Middle Eocene). A complex erosional surface developed during the Late Oligocene–Early Miocene. Sedimentation was impeded since then on the intermediate and deep sites of Demerara Rise, possibly due to the action of deep submarine currents.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2005 Académie des sciences
ISSN: 1631-0713
Keywords: tropical atlantic; Demerara; cretaceous; tertiary; black shales
Academic Unit/Department: Science > Environment, Earth and Ecosystems
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Earth, Planetary, Space and Astronomical Research (CEPSAR)
Item ID: 26796
Depositing User: Philip Sexton
Date Deposited: 24 Mar 2011 12:31
Last Modified: 14 Jan 2014 10:33
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/26796
Share this page:

Altmetrics

Scopus Citations

Actions (login may be required)

View Item
Report issue / request change

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   + 44 (0)870 333 4340   general-enquiries@open.ac.uk