The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Challenging boundaries to 'employability': women apprentices in a non-traditional occupation

Andrew, Alison (2009). Challenging boundaries to 'employability': women apprentices in a non-traditional occupation. Social Policy and Society, 8(3) pp. 347–359.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Accepted Manuscript) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (97Kb)
DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://doi.org/10.1017/S1474746409004898
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

This article is based on a case study of women apprentices and workers in a 'non-traditional' occupation for women, engineering construction. The article argues that the concept of 'employability' is not gender neutral, and that gendered assumptions about who is and is not 'employable' for particular work can disadvantage women seeking training and work in non-traditional industries or dissuade them from applying to do so. Approaches to employability which emphasise individual attributes underplay the significance of gender inequalities and wider discourses of gender.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2009 Cambridge University Press
ISSN: 1474-7464
Keywords: employability; gender; non-traditional occupations
Academic Unit/Department: Social Sciences > Sociology
Social Sciences
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Citizenship, Identities and Governance (CCIG)
Item ID: 25688
Depositing User: Alison Andrew
Date Deposited: 21 Dec 2010 14:41
Last Modified: 24 Feb 2016 06:04
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/25688
Share this page:

Altmetrics

Scopus Citations

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

▼ Automated document suggestions from open access sources

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   + 44 (0)870 333 4340   general-enquiries@open.ac.uk