The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

A twin study of cognitive costs of low birth weight and catch-up growth

Estourgie-van Burk, G. Frederiek; Bartels, Meike; Hoekstra, Rosa A.; Polderman, Tinca J. C.; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette A. and Boomsma, Dorret I. (2009). A twin study of cognitive costs of low birth weight and catch-up growth. Journal of Pediatrics, 154(1) pp. 29–32.

Full text available as:
Full text not publicly available
Due to copyright restrictions, this file is not available for public download
Click here to request a copy from the OU Author.
DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2008.07.016
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

Objective: To investigate whether there is an association between catch-up growth and cognitive performance in humans.

Study design: Catch-up growth was defined as the change in weight standard deviation scores during the first 2 years of life. Cognitive performance was assessed with psychometric IQ tests, administered at ages 12 and 18 years. Data were collected in twin pairs, and analyses were carried out within pairs.

Results: There was a significant negative association between catch-up growth and IQ at both ages 12 and 18 years.

Conclusions: A larger gain in weight during the first 2 years of life is associated with a lower IQ. However, catch-up growth is correlated with birth weight and this correlation may explain part of the association.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2009 Mosby Inc.
ISSN: 0022-3476
Academic Unit/Department: Science > Life, Health and Chemical Sciences
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Biomedical Research Network (BRN)
Item ID: 25586
Depositing User: Rosa Hoekstra
Date Deposited: 16 Dec 2010 10:43
Last Modified: 21 Mar 2014 06:48
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/25586
Share this page:

Altmetrics

Scopus Citations

Actions (login may be required)

View Item
Report issue / request change

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   + 44 (0)870 333 4340   general-enquiries@open.ac.uk