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Animals, identity and persistence

Belshaw, Christopher (2011). Animals, identity and persistence. Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 89(3) pp. 401–419.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00048402.2010.497190
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Abstract

A number of claims are closely connected with, though logically distinct from, animalism. One is that organisms cease to exist when they die. Two others concern the relation of the brain, or the brainstem, to animal life. One of these holds that the brainstem is necessary for life - more precisely, that (say) my cat's brainstem is necessary for my cat's life to continue. The other is that it is sufficient for life - more precisely, that so long as (say) my cat's brainstem continues to function, so too does my cat. I argue against these claims.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2011 Taylor & Francis
ISSN: 1471-6828
Academic Unit/Department: Arts > Philosophy
Item ID: 25406
Depositing User: Christopher Belshaw
Date Deposited: 07 Jan 2011 11:22
Last Modified: 23 Oct 2012 14:24
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/25406
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