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A European research agenda for lifelong learning

Sloep, Peter; Boon, Jo; Cornu, Bernard; Kleb, Michael; Lefrère, Paul; Naeve, Ambjörn; Scott, Peter and Tinoca, Luis (2008). A European research agenda for lifelong learning. In: European Association of Distance Teaching Universities, Annual Conference 2008, 18 - 19 Sep 2008, Poitiers, France.

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URL: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/1482
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Abstract

It is a generally accepted truth that without a proper educational system no country will prosper, nor will its inhabitants. With the arrival of the post-industrial society, in Europe and elsewhere, it has become increasingly clear that people should continue learning over their entire life-spans lest they or their society suffer the dire consequences. But what does this future lifelong learning society exactly look like? And how then should education prepare for it? What should people learn and how should they do so? How can we afford to pay for all this, what are the socio-economic constraints of the move towards a lifelong-learning society? And, of course, what role can and should the educational establishment of schools and universities play? This are questions that demand serious research efforts, which is what this paper argues for.

Item Type: Conference Item
Copyright Holders: 2008 The Authors
Academic Unit/Department: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Knowledge Media Institute (KMi)
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Computing (CRC)
Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Item ID: 25162
Depositing User: Kay Dave
Date Deposited: 08 Dec 2010 11:38
Last Modified: 05 Oct 2016 08:36
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/25162
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