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Quo vadis the social sciences? Appropriating ground in the indeterminacy of knowldge crisis - the role of qualitativesocial work research

Oak, Eileen (2007). Quo vadis the social sciences? Appropriating ground in the indeterminacy of knowldge crisis - the role of qualitativesocial work research. International Journal of the Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, 1(5) pp. 69–78.

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Abstract

Drawing upon my Ph.D. research in this area, the paper examines the discursive dimensions of social policy oriented research, which has coincided with the indeterminacy of knowledge crisis in the social sciences. It considers the implications of the indeterminacy crisis for the legitmation of both the natural and social sciences, and evaluates the contribution qualitative social work research and chaos theory can make to the development of new normative foundations in the social sciences, in particular sociology. The issue is explored within the context of the social exclusion debate in contemporary UK welfare by reflecting upon the discursive dimensions of social inclusion policies for children and young people in the United Kingdom.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2007 (this paper), the author(s)
ISBN: 0-230-00464-4, 978-0-230-00464-1
ISSN: 1833-1882
Keywords: sociology; social work; indeterminacy of knowldge crisis; chaos theory; looked after children; discursive dimensions of science; cosmopolitanism
Academic Unit/Department: Health and Social Care > Health and Social Care
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Citizenship, Identities and Governance (CCIG)
Item ID: 24756
Depositing User: Eileen Oak
Date Deposited: 01 Mar 2011 10:13
Last Modified: 08 Jun 2012 03:58
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/24756
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