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Requirements analysis in context with POE design

Hall, Jon and Rapanotti, Lucia (2009). Requirements analysis in context with POE design. In: Nistazakis, Manos; Poernomo, Dr Iman and Tsaramirsis, George eds. Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Requirements Analysis. Pearson.

URL: http://www.amazon.co.uk/INTERNATIONAL-WORKSHOP-REQ...
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Abstract

Requirements Analysis is the area of business analysis and software engineering that deals with the understanding, representation, negotiation, integration, validation and specification of business requirements aiming to define the specification of IT systems. The importance of Requirements Analysis was identified from the early days of software engineering and an analysis phase has been included in most of the software development lifecycle model. A number of methods for eliciting requirements specification have emerged and are successfully applied in industry. However, still a large number IT projects often fail to meet requirements at the end of project lifecycle. A central problem in the IT industry is that there is a gap between what the client expects and what he gets. Business requirements are not always mapped to the actual system design due to development overhead, misunderstanding or ignorance of the requirements by the development teams and lack of resources. It is generally admitted that inadequate or non-existent models, approaches and methodologies are not the only cause of failure at the requirement analysis stage. Poor project management, organisational politics, false business priorities, lack of commitment and other issues can also cause a project to fail. While all these are understandable, they are not a good excuse for the 70%+ failure rate, currently experienced with IT projects. This problem has been timely and many researchers have worked in the area, achieving considerable results. These results however, are either isolated from the industry or too theoretical to be applied to real projects. Some professionals propose a number of solutions that help them complete their day to day tasks, but these are usually specific to a particular project and cannot always be transferred to another project. Finally, most IT experts do not use requirements analysis approaches and methods, and are often unfamiliar with them, so that the object oriented analysis and diagrams that the minority of designers are using can appear alien to business stakeholders. This book consists of papers written by both active academics and professionals in the area of requirements analysis and explores their practical proposals to the problem of requirement analysis. These papers were selected from submissions to the International Workshop on Requirements Analysis (IWRA 2008) that was held at King s College London, on the 6th and 7th of December 2008 (http://palab.dcs.kcl.ac.uk/iwra/index.html). The selection committee consisted of elite academic and industry leaders to ensure high quality. The following topics are covered in the book: - Organizational semiotics, the MEASUR framework and the semantic normal form notation - Problem Oriented Engineering - Requirements identification and prioritisation - A Process-oriented Requirements Analysis Framework and Process-oriented architectures - Best practice in IT service management, Human aspects and Culture. This book is a complement to the theoretical literature of requirements analysis with an applied perspective. The book is looking into Requirements Analysis from a more practical perspective focusing on how business requirements can be mapped to design. Alternative approaches will also be presented as well as criticisms of the approaches and the wider area of requirements analysis. The intended audience of this book is IT system analysts, business analysts, software engineers, software testers, graduate students in computer science, informatics or business, the Requirements Engineering research community, and the wider information Systems and software engineering communities. emerged and are successfully applied in industry. However, still a large number IT projects often fail to meet requirements at the end of project lifecycle. A central problem in the IT industry is that there is a gap between what the client expects and what he gets. Business requirements are not always mapped to the actual system design due to development overhead, misunderstanding or ignorance of the requirements by the development teams and lack of resources. It is generally admitted that inadequate or non-existent models, approaches and methodologies are not the only cause of failure at the requirement analysis stage. Poor project management, organisational politics, false business priorities, lack of commitment and other issues can also cause a project to fail. While all these are understandable, they are not a good excuse for the 70%+ failure rate, currently experienced with IT projects. This problem has been timely and many researchers have worked in the area, achieving considerable results. These results however, are either isolated from the industry or too theoretical to be applied to real projects. Some professionals propose a number of solutions that help them complete their day to day tasks, but these are usually specific to a particular project and cannot always be transferred to another project. Finally, most IT experts do not use requirements analysis approaches and methods, and are often unfamiliar with them, so that the object oriented analysis and diagrams that the minority of designers are using can appear alien to business stakeholders. This book consists of papers written by both active academics and professionals in the area of requirements analysis and explores their practical proposals to the problem of requirement analysis. These papers were selected from submissions to the International Workshop on Requirements Analysis (IWRA 2008) that was held at King s College London, on the 6th and 7th of December 2008 (http://palab.dcs.kcl.ac.uk/iwra/index.html). The selection committee consisted of elite academic and industry leaders to ensure high quality. The following topics are covered in the book: - Organizational semiotics, the MEASUR framework and the semantic normal form notation - Problem Oriented Engineering - Requirements identification and prioritisation - A Process-oriented Requirements Analysis Framework and Process-oriented architectures - Best practice in IT service management, Human aspects and Culture. This book is a complement to the theoretical literature of requirements analysis with an applied perspective. The book is looking into Requirements Analysis from a more practical perspective focusing on how business requirements can be mapped to design. Alternative approaches will also be presented as well as criticisms of the approaches and the wider area of requirements analysis. The intended audience of this book is IT system analysts, business analysts, software engineers, software testers, graduate students in computer science, informatics or business, the Requirements Engineering research community, and the wider information Systems and software engineering communities.

Item Type: Book Chapter
Copyright Holders: 2009 Author
ISBN: 1-84776-663-3, 978-1-84776-663-2
Academic Unit/Department: Mathematics, Computing and Technology > Computing & Communications
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Computing (CRC)
Item ID: 24514
Depositing User: Jon Hall
Date Deposited: 12 Dec 2010 10:34
Last Modified: 23 Oct 2012 14:37
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/24514
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