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The politics of simulation: actors' information system use

Emberson, Caroline and Storey, John (2008). The politics of simulation: actors' information system use. In: 3rd International Organisational Learning, Knowledge and Capabilities Conference, 28-30 Apr 2008, University of Aarhus Copenhagen.

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Abstract

The dynamic, social and political nature of actors' information system use has been under explored and under appreciated within studies of organisational learning. In this paper we use ideographic case study data of collaborative merchandising practices in the UK clothing retail industry to explore how actors learned to use ICT-based data representations to their advantage. Our findings cast doubt on any straightforward connection between the data generated by these systems and the physical realities they purport to represent. In this paper, we make diagnostic use of the concepts of 'practical meaning' and 'simulacra' to explore this phenomenon. The implications of these findings for future research are discussed.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2008 The Authors
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Not SetNot SetESRC (Economic and Social Research Council)
Keywords: information systems; politics; inter-organisational learning processes; simulacra
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Business and Law (FBL)
Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) > Business > Department for People and Organisations
Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) > Business
Research Group: Innovation, Knowledge & Development research centre (IKD)
Related URLs:
Item ID: 23963
Depositing User: Caroline Emberson
Date Deposited: 19 Nov 2010 09:49
Last Modified: 09 May 2019 10:51
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/23963
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