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Mozambique’s Elite – Finding its Way in a Globalized World and Returning to Old Development Models

Hanlon, Joseph and Mosse, Marcelo (2010). Mozambique’s Elite – Finding its Way in a Globalized World and Returning to Old Development Models. UNU-Wider.

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Abstract

What makes elites developmental instead of predatory? We argue that Mozambique’s elite was developmental at independence 35 years ago. With pressure and encouragement from international forces, it became predatory. It has now partly returned to its developmental roots and is trying to use the state to promote the creation of business groups that could be large enough and dynamic enough to follow a development model with some similarities to the Asian Tigers, industrial development in Latin America, or Volkskapitalisme in apartheid South Africa. But Mozambique’s elite has also returned to two other traditions – that development is done by the elite and by foreigners. There is little support for development of local SMEs and agricultural development has been left to foreign-owned plantations.

Item Type: Other
Copyright Holders: 2010 UNU-WIDER
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies > Development
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Research Group: Innovation, Knowledge & Development research centre (IKD)
Item ID: 23271
Depositing User: Joseph Hanlon
Date Deposited: 27 Sep 2010 09:19
Last Modified: 08 Aug 2019 10:51
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/23271
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