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Ultrasonic wave propagation in stereo-lithographical bone replicas

Aygün, Haydar; Attenborough, Keith; Lauriks, Walter and Langton, Christian M. (2010). Ultrasonic wave propagation in stereo-lithographical bone replicas. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 127(6) pp. 3781–3789.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.3397581
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Abstract

Predictions of a modified anisotropic Biot–Allard theory are compared with measurements of pulses centered on 100 kHz and 1 MHz transmitted through water-saturated stereo-lithographical bone replicas. The replicas are 13 times larger than the original bone samples. Despite the expected effects of scattering, which is neglected in the theory, at 100 kHz the predicted and measured transmitted waveforms are similar. However, the magnitude of the leading negative edge of the waveform is overpredicted, and the trailing parts of the waveforms are not predicted well. At 1 MHz, although there are differences in amplitudes, the theory predicts that the transmitted waveform is almost a scaled version of that incident in conformity with the data.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2010 Acoustical Society of America
ISSN: 0001-4966
Keywords: bioacoustics; biomedical ultrasonics; bone; ultrasonic propagation; ultrasonic scattering
Academic Unit/Department: Mathematics, Computing and Technology > Engineering & Innovation
Item ID: 22616
Depositing User: Users 8259 not found.
Date Deposited: 04 Aug 2010 10:37
Last Modified: 21 Aug 2013 15:18
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/22616
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