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Sweet talking: Food, language, and democracy

Cook, Guy (2010). Sweet talking: Food, language, and democracy. Language Teaching, 43(2) pp. 168–181.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444809990140
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Abstract

At a time of diminishing resources, the sum of apparently minor personal decisions about food can have immense impact. These individual choices are heavily influenced by language, as those with vested interests seek to persuade individuals to act in certain ways. This makes the language of food politics a fitting area for an expanding applied linguistics oriented towards real-world language-related problems of global and social importance. The paper draws upon five consecutive research projects to show how applied linguistics research may contribute to public policy and debate, and also how, by entering such new arenas, it can develop its own methods and understanding of contemporary language use.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2010 Cambridge University Press
ISSN: 0261-4448
Keywords: applied linguistics; food policy; GMOs; organic food; school dinners
Academic Unit/Department: Education and Language Studies > Centre for Language and Communication
Education and Language Studies
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Item ID: 21269
Depositing User: Guy Cook
Date Deposited: 04 May 2010 10:00
Last Modified: 24 Feb 2016 19:37
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/21269
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